Photography interview with Deepika Hatton

An online interview with Deepika Hatton currently her final year at James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland, Australia. It was part of an investigation into Creative Industries for a case study. The case study is intended to provide aclearer understanding into the photography industry and what it takes to break into this field of work.
1) What education did you take before getting into this industry?

None.

2) What did you do to find work in the industry?

I printed business cards, I watermark my photos often. I do good work and then people recommend me to others.

3) pre requisites for the career : Passion, dedication, equipment, time management?

passion I think. If you don’t love photography, you won’t be putting your effort into being the best you can be and being creative. Patience is needed to cope with the times when nothing seems to be working out for a while. Of course for sports, concerts, etc. certain equipment will get you highly printable photos and a higher success rate of sharper photos (given movement of the subject). But you still need to understand your equipment and have an instinct for moments and timing. If you are doing something in easier conditions, such as a daylight model shoot, or a party or a landscape, you can get professional results with entry level equipment if you know how to use it really well.

Planning is important to avoid double booking events and to make sure there is enough time to edit and send photos on a deadline.

4) day to day activities and monthly activities that occur?

I like to go out and take photos for fun of things around me. I get asked to a lot of events/parties, at least one a month I would say. Every couple of weeks I do a model shoot and I used to go to concerts a lot.

5) After graduating University/ Colledge did you find it esasy to get a job yes or no? and why?

I am still studying Marketing at my university so I am not into photography fully. It is easy to get work as a photographer, but typically in parties and not in specialised areas.

6) What advice would you give to someone starting up a portfolio : online, facebook, hardcopy? and what makes a good portoflio and why?

It should be short – www.michael.currin.co.za my DeviantArt portfolio limits to 4 galleries with about 18 pictures each. I only put my best photos on there and I update every few months. If you want to post hundreds of photos from events etc., put them on your personal Facebook page, photography FB page, or on a blog.

7) Whats the biggest learning experience you have faced / dealt with in this industry example: travelling, money, changing jobs?

Working with people is very difficult. It’s easier to do jobs or photos for fun which don’t require a team of make-up, stylists etc. but sometimes you need them and have to work around when they are late or they are busy that day.

8) Do you take on interns / trainees? if so, what jobs are they given?

I have occasional requests for someone to be my apprentice, though I can’t take on everyone and it would be unfair to choose only one. So I have a few friends who ask for advice online or in person, also sometimes I go on a daytrip with to teach them about their camera on an interesting location.

9) How long have you been a phographer for / where did you first start out?

I got my first camera at the end of 2007 but I have only been taking it seriously since I upgrade to a semi-professional quality camera at the start of 2010.

10) Do you think the photography industry is dying out because of amature photographers? yes or no and why?

I like how information and equipment is a lot more freely available because their are so many people demanding it as customers and businesses are providing it. I have at least 10 photography books and I know of several camera stores in my area.

However I have heard that professionals find it more difficult to get work then there are so many amateurs who are increasing their skills and sometimes getting great results with budget equipment. I think this will mean professionals have to work harder to be seen as the best and very creative. No one says it is easy to make money in photography (except if you are brilliant at weddings or something, but that takes years), so if professionals can’t make it then they might have to have a second job to keep someselves going.