Cannon at Animals Rock festival, 2010-11-13

Photo: michael.currin.co.za

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Concert Photography Tips – DSLR settings

You can see a growing of many list of concerts I have taken photos at, mostly small dimly lit clubs and couple of large stages in Cape Town, South Africa. I took the photos in this article with a D90 and a Nikon 18-105mm kit lens or a  Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8, edited in Lightroom.

Dim stage with a slow kit lens

LA Cobra - 18mm, 1/80, f/3.5, ISO2000

A kit lens that comes with the camera will typically say f/3.5-5.6 which is considered “slow” as you have to use longer exposures (meaning blur) or higher ISOs (meaning noise) to achieve as much light as a higher quality low-light lens (read on for that).

  • Aperture: 3.5 is the best at a wide angle, your lens will be forced to f/4, f/5, f/5.6 or f/6.3 as you zoom. So for bright photos, stand closer, zoom less and crop more on your computer.
  • Exposure: 1/125, 1/100, 1/80 or even 1/60 if you already have a high ISO and have something to lean on to stablilise yourself, you have a VR or IS lens,  or the band is standing fairly still.
  • ISO settings: Turn AUTO ISO Off so that it stays at a value you fix. I prefer ISO 800, I use 1600 at some venues and if its really dark I use 2000 or 3200. Those last two mean you should probably turn the camera’s noise reduction to High, or leave it off and use higher values in Lightroom 3 etc.
  • Mode: Manual

Dim stage with a low-light lens

Stonecollar - 24mm, 1/100, f/2.8, ISO800

  • Aperture: A zoom lens with f/2.8 on it will stay wide open at that aperture throughout the zoom range so that you don’t lose brightness as you zoom. Even better can be a prime lens such as 50mm f/1.8 or 30mm f/1.4.
  • Exposure: 1/160, 1/125, 1/100 or even 1/80
  • ISO settings: Usually 400 or 800, sometimes having to resort to 1600 or 3200 at some venues but still achieving professional and fairly noise free photos.
  • Mode: Manual, or Aperture priority with an EV of say -3.

Bright stage, any lens

Wishbone Ash - 42mm, 1/400, f/3.5, ISO400

  • Aperture: you can probably afford to use values like f/4 and f/5.6, or like f/8 and f/11 if the lighting is shining right at you, which will also give a starburst effect. These settings allow use to get more of the musicians in focus (wider depth of field) while also reaching your lens’s “sweet-spot” for sharpness usually two stops above the widest. e.g. on a f/2.8 lens the sweet spot is f/5.6, on f/3.5 it’s f/8
  • Exposure: you can probably use 1/200, 1/320  or 1/500 which will freeze musicians and their hair as they jump about the stage.
  • ISO: If the lighting is pretty constant, set AUTO ISO ON with values from 200 to 800 and set a value for  Exposure Value (EV) compensation at like -3 or -2. The ISO will change based on if you are aiming at a light or dark part of the stage. If the the lighting is changing every second so that your camera always gets the photo brightness way off,  you are better off setting ISO yourself (AUTO ISO OFF) and using Manual mode.
  • Mode: Manual, Program, Aperture Priority (e.g. f/2.8 for narrow depth of field), Shutter Priority (e.g. 100 for wider DOF or 200 for freezing action).

Small stage with flash

Heldervue with mixed remote flash (from below) and stage lighting - 24mm, 1/60, f/2.8, ISO500

I have only used my new flash (SB-600) so far at once concert and it was a dark venue with lights aimed at the guitars rather than musicians’ faces. But my flash was capable of lighting up the stage well, or the whole crowd when I aimed it over their heads.

I like to use handheld off-camera flash (remote) and bounce it off the low ceiling (works well even though its black).

I use the built-in diffuser camera most of the time since I am close to or on the edge of the stage.

The point of flash is to get sharp pictures (little or no blur) even in dimly lit enviroments, as well as using it creatively. An advatange is that you can use lower ISO values such as 200 to reduce noise, but even at 400 or 800 (which makes the flash seem to reach further) I had no problems of noise in the bright or shadowy areas. I used JPG and Normal Noise Reduction – when not using flash, I highly recommend using the RAW format unless you hate post-processing which involves touching up your photos without losing image quality.

So I suggest…

  • Aperture: f/2.8 or f/3.5 for narrow depth of field effect. This makes photos look more professional if the focus is right and the wider value will also mean brigther photos especially shooting musicians at a distance. Use f/4, f/5.6 or f/8 if you are close the musicians and you want more of them to be in focus (face as well as guitar, or guitarist and bassist).
  • Exposure: Using 1/60 (default in program mode) will let it a decent amount of ambient stage lighting but might get ghosting and blur on strumming hands. You can use a shorter value in Shutter Priority or Manual Mode, or set flash on Rear Curtain sync on the camera.
  • ISO settings: 200 to 800 should be fine. If you leave AUTO ISO ON, you should probably set Exposure compensation (EV) on the camera. Also generally set Flash compensation (FV) on the camera or flash to a lower value so that the flash lasts longer or pictures are darkened.

Reburn's singer showing front curtain flash ghosting - 24mm (cropped photo), 1/60, f/2.8, ISO400

Turn High Speed Sync on and it will automatically kick in should you use shutter values shorter than say 1/250 of a second, but it’s not really necessary for concerts.

I like to be able to change quickly between flash and non-flash shots with as few buttons as possible. So I set my camera up as follows: External flash is on, camera in manual mode at 1/60 and whatever aperture I need. Auto ISO is ON with values 200 to 1600, but stays at 200 while the flash is on. I turn the flash unit off, ISO changes to 1600 (because the scene is dark) and I change exposure to something like 1/100 (2 turns of the dial) and aperture to f/2.8 if it wasn’t there already.

Depth of field

Black Market Riots - 65mm, 1/100, f/2.8, ISO250

If you are using a low light lens (f/2.8 or faster), then depth of field will be much smaller (less in focus). This is great for artistic reasons (see the photo above) but if you don’t want that effect all the time, use a value like f/3.5 or f/4 when lighting is bright during a certain song, stand further back,t use the wide rather than zoomed end of your lens. Set AF-area to Single or Dynamic rather than Auto, then you can use  AF point system in the viewfinder to aim at eyes and faces, usually on the musician closest to you. Focusing in Live View seems to be slower and less accurate in my experience but helps alot when used with Manual focus (set on both your lens and your camera body) if your camera struggles to find something to focus on.

 

A good lesson I found on choosing lenses for concerts. Choosing Lenses For Concert Photography

 

Stonecollar at the Purple Turtle

Bryan Nicol drummer

Bryan Nicol

Stonecollar at the Purple Turtle in Cape Town South Africa, 30 April 2010.

Leshem Petersen

Leshem Petersen

Clinton Jurgens

Clinton Jurgens

Sean Tait

Sean Tait

Find the band on Facebook here. More of my photos of Stonecollar on Facebook here.

Playlisting and Shuffling

As someone who loves music and getting the most out of software, I decided to explain how I have set up smart filters in iTunes so that the iTunes DJ (aka Party Shuffle) randomly plays songs I probably haven’t heard but will also probably like.

Background info:

  • The music comes mostly from CDs ripped on my father’s computer and iTunes collection.
  • Stored on my Seagate terrabyte (1000GB) external hard drive, along with my photos, as my laptop is limited.
  • A mixture of bands  from those I know well to not at all.
  • Genres ranging from rock, punk and metal to ska, blues and classical.

Playlisting:

I enjoy a lot of music but I am not always in the mood for 60s music (with old recording quality) or hard rock. So I have a GENERAL smart playlist which is my whole library exclusding music from certain normal playlists I have compiled such as BLUES and METAL. Regardless of the genre columns, if I find a song in GENERAL that belongs in BLUES, I drag it there and it also disappears from GENERAL. There is no overlap.

Then I created an Unrated ’70+ playlist. Conditions:

  • Playlist is GENERAL or  TRYOUT sort (not yet allocated to a genre playlist).
  • Rating is unrated
  • Year is greater than 1970.

Shuffling:

My iTunes DJ is set up with Source as the Unrated ’70+ playlist.

I leave the DJ playing in the background while working on my laptop and if I notice a song I want to rate, I give it a 3 or 4 out of 5 usually. It will continue to play once rated, but because of the condition mentioned above it will disappear from Unrated ’70+ playlist and such will not play again in iTunes DJ.

So I get to listen to a lot of songs fitting in GENERAL and easy to listen to, and that I haven’t yet properly listened to and rated before. I figure that I want to spend more time listeing to songs I don’t know than just playing the songs rated 4 stars and above, which I get tired of if I listen to too often.

Photo of the Week entries

Every week I submit a Photo of the Week for the saockdigest and these are some of the best, from January to March 2010.
You can see my band photography portfolio at michael.currin.co.za.

Concerts I Have Photographed

Stonecollar at the Purple Turtle in Cape Town. Photo: michael.currin.co.za

Stonecollar at the Purple Turtle in Cape Town.

Popular South African bands I’ve taken photos of: Just Jinjer, Kurt Darren, Watershed, Johnny Clegg, Arno Carstens, BLK JKS.

International: Feeder, 30 Seconds to Mars, Daughtry, Deep Purple, Uriah Heep, Wishbone Ash Rammstein

 

Other gigs in and around Cape Town that I have taken photos of – this list has moved to here on my band photography blog.

 

My feed of photos for the sarockdigest.com photo of the week here.